San Francisco is one of the first cities in the country to undertake a public campaign to raise awareness of ageism, dispel negative stereotypes of older adults, and connect residents with supportive services.

The Reframing Aging San Francisco campaign, a multi-media advertising and public relations effort, is a partnership of the San Francisco Human Services Agency’s Department of Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), the Metta Fund, the Community Living Campaign, and a network of over 30 community providers and advocates, including Meals on Wheels SF

The campaign (which can be seen on Muni buses, Caltrain, and light pole banners in SF between October through December) features visually arresting portraits that highlight the diversity of the aging experience and celebrate the strengths that remain with us throughout our lifetimes, such as leadership, courage, passion, creativity, and intelligence.

        

A partnership of the San Francisco Human Services Agency’s Department of Aging and Adult Services (DAAS), the Metta Fund, the Community Living Campaign, and a network of over 30 community providers and advocates, the Reframing Aging San Francisco campaign is based on local research and a growing national movement towards creating more inclusive communities around aging. 

Ageism is prejudice or discrimination based on assumptions about someone’s age. Ageism may be directed towards older people by younger generations or be internalized by someone as a sense of diminished value as they age. Dispelling stereotypes about older adults and promoting positive images about aging is more important than ever, as San Francisco’s demographics are changing.

“There is a misperception that our City’s reputation for innovation and vibrancy comes only from a growing number of young people. In fact, older adults are the fastest growing age group in San Francisco. Their experience and energy are assets that we should draw on, not minimize,” said Mayor London Breed. “When we rely on negative stereotypes about older people, we miss out on the joy, intelligence, and other strengths that older San Franciscans contribute to our workplaces and communities.”

To learn more, sign a pledge to help end ageism, and find links to volunteer opportunities and services for older adults in San Francisco, visit EndAgeism.com today!